Python Scripts

Over the years I’ve written quite a few python utilities. Most of them are really short, and too specific to be useful to others. Those that aren’t are so long that they don’t feel elegant enough to share.

And then, between these two extremes, are the gems that I find myself coming back to time and again. I thought I’d share these with you. Keep in mind that all of these are covered by the Paul Spooner “IP is Wicked Nonsense” license, and you are encouraged to evaluate them on their own merits as distinct from their history. If you insist that the origins of ideas are important, then go pledge your support to my efforts.

TextOddifier.py is a text manipulation script to convert letters in UTF-8 to fairly similar looking letters. It makes text that looks like this ḽӧœĸ ŀįҟԙ ҭԡ༑ṩ ѩʼnᵴťӕаԂ. You can find the source below, or through the link at the start of the description.

# Similar letter substituter
# To make text look a bit strange

from random import choice

SLD = { 'A':'ĀĂĄАѦѨӐӒӔḀẲⰡ⍲ᗗ','a':'āăąаѧѩӑӓӕḁẳ⎀',
        'B':'ВѢҌ฿ḂḄḆᙗᙫ','b':'ЉЊБЪЬъыьѣҍḃḅḇᒀᖲ',
        'C':'ĆĊČСҪℂ℃','c':'ćĉċčсҫ',
        'D':'ĎĐḊḌḎḐḒ⫐⫒ᗫᗤ','d':'ďđԀԁԂԃḓḑḏḍḋᑽᖱ',
        'E':'ĒĔĖĘĚŒЀЁЄЕѤӔӖԘ⋵⋶ᕮ','e':'ēĕėęěœеѐёѥӕӗԙ',
        'F':'ҒӺḞ℉ᖴ','f':'ſғӻẛẜẝḟ',
        'G':'ĜĞĠĢԌḠ','g':'ĝğġģḡ',
        'H':'ĤĦЊНҔҢҤӇӉԊԢԨԪ','h':'ĥħЂЋђћҕңҥӈӊԡԦԧℎℏ',
        'I':'ĨĪĬİIJІЇЮѤѨӀ','i':'ĩīĭįıijіїѩ༐༑',
        'J':'IJĴЈЉӇԈԒԔᒏ','j':'ijĵЛјӈԓԕ',
        'K':'ĶЌЖКҖҚҜҞҠӃԖԞԪ','k':'ķĸкҗқҝҟҡӄԗԟ',
        'L':'ĹĻĽĿŁḶḸḺḼᒺ','l':'ĺļľŀłӏḷḹḻḽ',
        'M':'МӍᴍḾṀṂ','m':'ӎᵚᵯmṃṁḿ',
        'N':'ŃŅŇŊЍИЙҊӢӤ','n':'ńņňʼnŋҋᵰ',
        'O':'ŌŎŐŒОЮѺӦ⥀⥁','o':'ōŏőœбоѻӧ',
        'P':'РҎԖⰒⰐᑬᑭᑮᑶᑸ','p':'рҏԗᵱⱀᖰ',
        'Q':'ҀԚⰢ','q':'ҁԛⱉᖳ',
        'R':'ŔŖŘЯԄԆԖԘ℞ᖇ','r':'ŕŗřѓг',
        'S':'ŚŜŞŠЅṦṨᔡ','s':'śŝşšѕᵴṩṧṥ',
        'T':'ŢŤŦЂЃЋГТѢѢҬԎ','t':'ţťŧҭԏ',
        'U':'ŨŪŬŮŰŲ⩂⩁⋃ᙈᙀ','u':'ũūŭůűų',
        'V':'ѴѶṼṾⰜ⩢⩣⩛⩝⍱⋁ᐻ','v':'ѵѷṿṽⱌ⩡',
        'W':'ŴѠѼѾԜ','w':'ŵѡѽѿԝ⍹',
        'X':'ЖХҖӁӜӼӾԔ','x':'жхҗӂӝӽӿԕẋ',
        'Y':'ŶŸЎУҮӮӰӲ','y':'ŷуўӯӱӳ',
        'Z':'ŹŻŽᤏᤁ','z':'źżžᙇ',
        '.':'.․⁝⁞',
        '?':'?‽⁇⁈',
        '!':'!‽⁉',
       }

def oddify(text):
    result = ""
    for i in text:
        try: result += choice(SLD[i])
        except: result += i
    return result

s = input("enter the text you want to oddify: ")
#s = "I don't even really know how this is going to work any more"

print(oddify(s))
input("Press enter when done:")

BaseConverter_py.py is a number base converter that we collaborated on to convert numbers to and from arbitrary radix. The neat thing about it is it works on floating point numbers as well as integers. The example (and test case) is 135.5 converted to base 12 is B3.6. Going the other way around, S4 in base 35 is 984 in decimal! You can find the source below, or through the link at the start of the description.

#!python
# dozinal.py

BASE = 12
PREC = 8
GLYPHS = {}
VALUES = {}

def compute_glyphs():
	global GLYPHS, VALUES
	GLYPHS = {}
	VALUES = {}

	for i in range(BASE):
		if i < 10: GLYPHS[i] = str(i)
		else: GLYPHS[i] = chr(i+55)

	for i in range(len(GLYPHS)):
		VALUES[GLYPHS[i]] = i

def rebase(num):
	if len(GLYPHS) != BASE: compute_glyphs()
	if num < 0:
		sign = '-'
		num = -num
	else: sign = ''
	whole = int(num)
	frac = num - whole

	whole_parts = []
	frac_parts = []
	prec = PREC
	while prec > 0:
		prec -= 1
		frac *= BASE

		part = int(frac)
		frac -= part
		if part == 0: break

		frac_parts.append(GLYPHS[part])

	while whole > 0:
		mod = whole % BASE
		whole = whole // BASE
		whole_parts.append(GLYPHS[mod])
		
	if len(whole_parts) == 0:
		whole_parts.append(GLYPHS[0])
	if len(frac_parts) == 0:
		return sign + "".join(reversed(whole_parts))

	return sign + "{}.{}".format("".join(reversed(whole_parts)),
			      "".join(frac_parts))

def debase(string):
	if len(GLYPHS) != BASE: compute_glyphs()
	if string[0] == '-':
		negative = True
		string = string[1:]
	else: negative = False
	try:
		whole_parts, frac_parts = string.split(".")
	except:
		whole_parts = string
		frac_parts = ''

	whole = 0

	for idx in range(len(whole_parts)):
		whole += VALUES[whole_parts[idx]]
		if idx < len(whole_parts) - 1:
			whole *= BASE

	frac = 0
	max_idx = len(frac_parts) - 1

	for idx in range(len(frac_parts)):
		part = frac_parts[max_idx - idx]
		frac += VALUES[part] / BASE

		if idx < max_idx:
			frac /= BASE

	result = whole + round(frac,PREC)
	if negative: return -result
	return result

TestConvert = 135.5
TestDozenal = rebase(TestConvert)
print("{} converted to base {} is".format(TestConvert,BASE), TestDozenal)
ConvertedBack = debase(TestDozenal)
print("{} in base {} is".format(TestDozenal,BASE), ConvertedBack, "in decimal")
if TestConvert == ConvertedBack: print("success!")
else: print("Something went wrong")
print("Assign BASE to set the number base,\nand PREC to set the precision.\nCall rebase() to convert,\nand debase() to convert back to decimal.")

Renamer.py Is a short program I wrote to do simple renaming operations on files. It only operates on the files in the folder, so it’s pretty easy to target. I include it here mostly as a syntax reminder.

# Rename files to add "_"

from os import rename, listdir
thesefiles = listdir()
target = "Prefix"
tlen = len(target)
	for f in thesefiles:
	if f[:tlen] == target:
		n = f
		n = n[:tlen] + '_' + n[tlen:]
		rename(f, n)
		print(n)

mcm_page.py is kind of an odd one. I really like the McMaster-Carr website, and enjoy browsing their catalog for inspiration. Time was when the catalog was paper that you could turn to a random page and peruse it. However, the online catalog is so efficient at delivering what you want that this becomes difficult. I’d also like to ensure that I don’t keep seeing the same page over again, at least until I’ve gone through the whole catalog. This script does all of that, opening a random page of the catalog when you start it, and allowing a save file listing all the pages you haven’t visited yet. Could be easily modified for other things… monte-carlo webcomic binges for example.

# opens a random McMaster Carr catalog page
from random import choice
import webbrowser

# 3873 fetched on 2017-09-20
HIGHEST_PAGE_NUMBER = 3873

try:
    f = open('mcm_page_numbers.txt','r')
    maxpgraw = f.readline()
    raw = f.readline()
    f.close()
    maxpg = int(maxpgraw)
    rem_pgs = eval(raw)
    if maxpg == HIGHEST_PAGE_NUMBER: pass
    elif maxpg > HIGHEST_PAGE_NUMBER:
        while len(rem_pgs)>0:
            if rem_pgs[-1] > HIGHEST_PAGE_NUMBER: rem_pgs.pop()
            else: break
    elif maxpg < HIGHEST_PAGE_NUMBER:
        for i in range(maxpg,HIGHEST_PAGE_NUMBER+1):
            rem_pgs.append(i)
    else: print("Something went terribly wrong")
except:
    rem_pgs = [i for i in range(1,HIGHEST_PAGE_NUMBER+1)]

inchoice = ""
print('Enter to bring up a McMaster page\n"s" to save, "sc" to save and close, "p" to print')
while len(rem_pgs) > 0:
    printflag = False
    if len(inchoice)!= 0:
        inchoice = inchoice.lower()
        initial = inchoice[0]
        if initial == 's':
            print("Saving")
            f = open('mcm_page_numbers.txt','w')
            f.write(str(HIGHEST_PAGE_NUMBER)+'\n')
            f.write(str(rem_pgs))
            f.close()
            if inchoice == 'sc': break
            inchoice = input('Saved :')
            
            continue
        elif initial == 'p':
            print(rem_pgs)
            inchoice = input('Those are the currently loaded indicies :')
            continue
    idx = choice(range(len(rem_pgs)))
    chosen_page = rem_pgs.pop(idx)
    webbrowser.open('https://www.mcmaster.com/#{}'.format(chosen_page))
    inchoice = input('Page {} queued:'.format(chosen_page))

This entry was posted in Meta by dudecon. Bookmark the permalink.

About dudecon

I'm a Christian, one of the "crazy fundamentalist" ones perhaps, depending on what language you speak. As an engineer by trade, and an artist, computer wizard, and musician in the off hours, I keep pretty busy. Plus I'm married with kids. Life is good, even when it is hard. People tell me that I think too much, but I can't think of how that's a bad thing. People also tell me I'm scary. Occasionally they tell me to stop singing so loudly. If you really want to contact me, you can try e-mailing dudecon on my old fashioned Hotmail account. Or tweet dudecon on twitter. Or come to my house some time. I'm sure you can find me if you keep trying.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *